Nature’s Energy Food

Nature’s Energy Food

Nature’s Energy Food

Honey… Natural Energy

Honey is a source of carbohydrates, providing 17 grams per tablespoon, which makes it ideal for your working muscles since carbohydrates are the primary fuel the body uses for energy. Carbohydrates are necessary in the diet to help maintain muscle glycogen, also known as stored carbohydrates, which are the most important fuel source for athletes to help them keep going.

Whether you’re looking for an energy boost or just a sweet reward after a long workout, honey is a quick, easy, and delicious all-natural energy source!

Honey as an Athletic Aid

Pre-exercise: For years, sports nutritionists have recommended eating carbohydrates before an athletic activity for an added energy boost.  As with many carbohydrates, pure honey may be an effective form to ingest just prior to exercise. When honey is eaten before a workout or athletic activity, it is released into the system at a steady rate throughout the event.

During Exercise: Consuming carbohydrates, such as honey, during a workout helps your muscles stay nourished longer and delays fatigue, versus not using any aid or supplement. Next time you reach for a simple bottle of water, add some honey to it – it might give you that much-needed athletic boost!

Post-exercise: An optimal recovery plan is essential for any athlete. Research shows that ingesting a combination of carbohydrates and protein immediately following exercise (within 30 minutes) is ideal to refuel and decrease delayed-onset muscle soreness. Therefore, honey is a great source of carbohydrate to combine with post-workout protein supplements.  In addition to promoting muscle recuperation and glycogen restoration, carb-protein combinations sustain favorable blood sugar concentrations after training.

Usage Tips

When planning your athletic training program, remember that honey is a source of carbohydrates, providing 17 grams at just 64 calories per tablespoon. Combining honey with fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains and other healthful foods can add to your total nutrition and give you a great natural energy boost. Try these tips to fuel your diet with the sweet goodness of honey!

  • Staying hydrated is one of the most important tools for an athlete. Simply add honey to your bottle of water for an energy boost during your next workout.
  • Snacks are a great way to add extra fruits and vegetables to your diet. Try mixing peanut butter and honey, or honey and light cream cheese, as a dip for fresh fruits or vegetables.
  • Peanut butter and honey sandwiches on whole wheat bread are a great, high-energy snack to provide a good combination of carbohydrates, protein and fat.
  • Since honey is a convenient, portable source of energy, take it with you for tournaments and long periods of activity to help sustain your energy levels.

Nature’s Energy Food Recipes

Put These 3 Ingredients in Your Coffee. After Just 2 Sips, Your Metabolism Will Be Faster Than Ever!

We all love our hot cup of coffee, especially at the beginning of the new day. Yet, not all of you are aware that its consumption also brings various health benefits.

It can boost your metabolism and give you more energy for the day.

Also, only a few know that you can transform your favorite morning brew into a metabolism booster and a potent fat burner! All you need to do is to add several ingredients to your coffee, and it will help you burn extra pounds without changing your diet or lifestyle!

These three mighty ingredients include:

1. Coconut oil is a real natural miracle which has a wide range of uses. It contains medium-chain fatty acids, which are immediately sent to the liver by the digestive system, and are either converted to energy or ketone bodies, and not in fat. It sets the metabolism to burn fat faster and more efficiently

The burning process of fats is significantly affected by minerals and vitamins, so honey can be of great help, as this gift of nature contains them in high amounts, and prevents any mineral or vitamin deficiencies.

2. Honey is abundant in sugar, but a natural one, which is needed for energy. Moreover, it is rich in vitamin B6, folate, vitamin C, niacin, and riboflavin, as well as numerous minerals, such as iron, calcium, sodium, zinc, potassium, and phosphorus.

Honey has been scientifically confirmed to be able to lower stress and regulate blood cholesterol levels. Use raw honey only.

3. Cinnamon is an extremely beneficial, anti-inflammatory agent which fights inflammation in the body, and due to its antioxidant properties, neutralizes the damage caused by free radicals.

Cinnamon boosts the blood sugar metabolism and thus lowers blood sugar levels. It prevents the accumulation of fat in the body as it supports the conversion of sugar into energy. The best cinnamon types are Ceylon and Cassia.

Here is how to use these remarkable natural ingredients and boost your metabolism while drinking your coffee:

Ingredients:

  • ¾ cup of coconut oil
  • ½  tbsp of honey
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon of cocoa (optional)

Instructions:

Mix these ingredients together in a glass jar, and store it in the fridge.

Use:

Every morning, you should add a teaspoon or two of the mixture to your freshly brewed coffee, stir well, and drink it! Enjoy!

Source: www.myhealthybook.com

Maybe You Aren’t Gluten Intolerant. Maybe You’re Just Poison Intolerant.

it’s happened to scores of other people, who pass the test for the anti-gliadin antibodies but still know that their health issues directly correlate with what they eat.

Now we may know why. The tests were right. I’m not gluten intolerant.  I’m poison intolerant.

I read a mind-blowing article last night in the Healthy Home Economist that put it all together for me.


“Standard wheat harvest protocol in the United States is to drench the wheat fields with Roundup several days before the combine harvesters work through the fields as withered, dead wheat plants are less taxing on the farm equipment and allows for an earlier, easier and bigger harvest.”
Pre-harvest application of the herbicide Roundup and other herbicides containing the deadly active ingredient glyphosate to wheat and barley as a desiccant was suggested as early as 1980.  It has since become routine over the past 15 years and is used as a drying agent 7-10 days before harvest within the conventional farming community.

According to Dr. Stephanie Seneff of MIT who has studied the issue in depth and who I recently saw present on the subject at a nutritional Conference in Indianapolis, desiccating non-organic wheat crops with glyphosate just before harvest came into vogue late in the 1990′s with the result that most of the non-organic wheat in the United States is now contaminated with it.  Seneff explains that when you expose wheat to a toxic chemical like glyphosate, it actually releases more seeds resulting in a slightly greater yield:   “It ‘goes to seed’ as it dies. At its last gasp, it releases the seed.”

According to the US Department of Agriculture, as of 2012, 99% of durum wheat, 97% of spring wheat, and 61% of winter wheat has been doused with Roundup as part of the harvesting process. This is an increase from 88% for durum wheat, 91% for spring wheat and 47% for winter wheat since 1998. (source)

How horrifying is it that they douse this stuff for human consumption with the most toxic, prevalent herbicide around, an herbicide which has been linked to all sorts of problems, just days before the harvest? That stuff doesn’t get removed – it gets milled in with the wheat and lurks in your bags of flour, your loaves of bread, and your desserts.

This could also explain why some people who have terrible gluten symptoms are able to eat products made from organic Einkorn wheat.  It may not be that it’s heirloom Einkorn – it could just be that it hasn’t been doused in glyphosate.

Modern farming practices are killing us. Here’s a little rundown on glyphosate:

The first study found that glyphosate increases the breast cancer cell proliferation in the parts-per-trillion range.

An alarming new study, accepted for publication in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology last month, indicates that glyphosate, the world’s most widely used herbicide due to its widespread use in genetically engineered agriculture, is capable of driving estrogen receptor mediated breast cancer cell proliferation within the infinitesimal parts per trillion concentration range.

The study, titled, “Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors,” compared the effect of glyphosate on hormone-dependent and hormone-independent breast cancer cell lines, finding that glyphosate stimulates hormone-dependent cancer cell lines in what the study authors describe as “low and environmentally relevant concentrations.”

Another study found that consumption of glyphosate causes intestinal and gut damage, which opens the door to numerous human diseases, such as diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders, heart disease, obesity, autism, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s

However, another classification of allergy-type food is emerging and getting recognized for adverse effects on the human intestinal tract and gut. Those foods are genetically modified organisms known as GMOs or GEs.

There is scientific research indicating intestinal damage from GMO food and the article “Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Disease” discusses how the inordinate amount of pesticides sprayed on GMOs leaves residues in GMO crops that, in turn, are being traced to modern diseases.

The Organic Consumers Association says:

“Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world.  According to the EPA, at least 208 million tons of Roundup were sprayed on GE crops, lawns and roadsides in the years 2006 and 2007. In 2007, as much as 185 million pounds of glyphosate was used by U.S. farmers, double the amount used just six years ago”

A 2009 study found that Americans use about 100 million pounds of glyphosate annually on their lawns and gardens. It’s safe to assume all these number are much higher now. Why? Because GE crops are now being invaded by new strains of herbicide-resistant “superweeds” requiring higher and higher doses of poison.

Beyond Pesticides has assembled extensive documentation of past research linking glyphosate to increased cancer risk, neurotoxicity and birth defects, as well as eye, skin, respiratory irritation, lung congestion, increased breathing rate, damage to the pancreas, kidney and testes.

Glyphosate also endangers the environment, destroys soil and plants, and is linked to a host of health hazards. The EPA’s decision to increase the allowed residue limits of glyphosate is out of date, dangerous to the health of people and the environment and scientifically unsupportable. (source)

Nearly all of the symptoms we chalk up to gluten intolerance can also be related to glyphosate exposure.

This horrific little farming shortcut may have created an epidemic across the country.

Just last week I picked up a loaf of organic sourdough bread to serve with some beef stew.  I was hesitant but astonished when I didn’t suffer abdominal pain, bloating, and digestive upset.  I thought, “Yay!  I ate bread and didn’t die!”

Sarah’s article blew my mind, because when I read it, all of the inconsistencies with my own gluten issues began to make sense. It explains why I can eat the fancy Italian pasta that a friend sent as a gift. It explains why the odd baked good from the organic bakery doesn’t make me sick. It explains the blood test that says I don’t have a problem with gluten, even though my gut says that I do have a problem.

It’s time to say no to Big Food. Vote with your wallet and forgo eating anything containing poisoned wheat. Either skip the wheat products entirely or choose organic wheat products.

Perhaps our family diet can get a little bit broader now. It would be far less expensive to buy a bag of organic flour than the gluten free flour that we use for baking, pancakes and thickening stuff.

Maybe the bloodwork was right. Maybe we aren’t actually gluten intolerant at all.

Maybe we are just poison intolerant.

 

 

 

This article is by Daisy Luther from TheOrganicPrepper. Please check the website out–it’s great and you should honor Daisy Luther’s guidelines for republishing. 

Daisy Luther  lives in a small village in the Pacific Northwestern area of the United States.  She is the author of The Organic Canner and The Pantry Primer: How to Build a One Year Food Supply in Three Months. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook and you can email her at daisy@theorganicprepper.ca

 

3 Simple Steps to Decrystallize Honey

3 Simple Steps to Decrystallize Honey

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3 Simple Steps to Decrystallize Honey

Have you ever reached into your cupboard, ready to enjoy some natural golden sweetness, and discovered your honey has crystallized?  Don’t panic. And don’t throw it out. Understand exactly what crystallization – also called granulation – is and follow these three simple steps to decrystallize your beloved sweet and make it liquid again.

How to Decrystallize Honey
Step 1
Place your bottle of honey with its lid off inside a pot. Pour warm water (to preserve honey’s health properties, water should not exceed 110º F) into the pan and allow to sit until the honey melts.

Step 2
In five-minute intervals remove your bottle from the pan, stir the honey and return it to the warm water. Continue this process until the honey has returned to its liquid consistency state.

Step 3
After your honey has returned to its normal consistency, remove the bottle from the pan and allow your honey to cool. Tightly seal the bottle and store at cool to room temperature.

*To prevent loss of honey’s health properties, water should not reach above 110F.

What is crystallized honey?
Crystallization does not mean your honey has gone bad. In fact, it’s honey’s natural process of preserving itself, often occurring after three to six months of storage. Do not throw it out! We repeat, do not throw it out! Crystallized honey is still edible. Some even enjoy its grainy consistency as a spread on toast or as a cooking ingredient.

Many factors contribute to honey crystallization. The main reason is its ingredient composition. Honey is a highly concentrated solution of two sugars: glucose and fructose. Typically, honey contains 70 percent carbohydrates and less than 20 percent water. Since this is unbalanced, the glucose separates from the water forming the crystallized appearance.

Besides its ingredient composition, what are other factors that contribute to crystallization?

The percentage of glucose vs. fructose in the honey. If there’s a higher percentage of glucose in the honey composition, the rate of crystallization may speed up.

The temperature where the honey is stored. If honey is stored in too cold an environment the speed of crystallization can increase, including when it’s in the honeycomb. So if your honey is hiding out in your fridge, you may want to place it in your pantry.

The amount of pollen in the honey. Whether your honey is raw, semi-processed or processed will determine how fast it crystallizes, and how much pollen it contains. Pollen in honey is normal, and verifies what plants the bees were feeding on. Raw honey contains more pollen grains than processed honey and therefore it can crystallize faster.

Kill Sinus Infection in 20 Seconds With This Simple Method And This Common Household Ingredient!

There is nothing quite as easy as this technique.

It call comes down to pushing your tongue against the roof of your mouth and placing the thumb in between your eyebrows.

You need to pressure the area you are holding with your thumb for 20 seconds. The first results come almost immediately, followed by sinus drainage.

Step-by-step method

The nasal cavity holds a bone, also known as the Vomer bone, which is placed vertically in the cavity. Lisa De Stefano, D.O., an assistant professor at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, assures us that this method is very successful because it allows the Vomer bone to move back and forth.

This ultimately treats congestion and empties the sinuses by draining.

The ingredient that can also help you to kill sinus infection is apple cider vinegar and 100% Raw local Honey 

The marvels that apple cider vinegar brings just can’t stop rising.

Its benefits are widely appreciated by the world’s population, and in this article we present how this magical liquid can cure your sinus infection in no time!

Viruses are usually responsible for causing sinus infection, and those viruses tend to stick inside the organism even after the lungs are cleared.

Basically, the sinuses lining becomes inflamed, and this occurrence leads to chronic headaches, discomfort and pain. In some cases, a fever could happen as well.

There are numerous medications available, promising to cure sinus infection rapidly, but nothing works quite as effective as the good old apple cider vinegar.

As common as it may be, apple cider vinegar is not to be underappreciated. It can easily reduce sinus pain and brings the sinus tissue to a healthy state.

Rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber, the ACV will cease any sickness symptoms and if consumed raw and unfiltered, will provide the greatest health benefits for your body.

Aside from this, your immune system will hugely benefit from consuming apple cider vinegar- and here is how to do it:

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1/4 cup unfiltered apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon raw honey
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 lemon, juiced

Preparation

First boil water and then combine it with apple cider vinegar in a glass. Throw in honey, cayenne pepper and stir well. Finally, add lemon juice. Consume remedy until you feel sinus pain relief.

Well done!

Source: www.healthy-holistic-living.com
Reference: www.davidwolfe.com

How to Make a Gallon of Mead

this years agenda !!!
How to Make a Gallon of Mead

March 1, 2015 by Grow Forage Cook Ferment —88 Comments
Maybe you’ve heard of mead before or maybe you haven’t, but one image that always seems to come to mind when mead is mentioned is Vikings drinking their grog. I don’t know a whole lot about Vikings, but I do know a bit about mead! Mead is a fermented honey and water mixture, some call it honey wine, and it is quite possibly the first fermented drink that humans purposefully made. Luckily for us, it’s quite easy to make! I’m going to show you how to make a gallon of mead, blueberry orange mead to be exact. Here’s what you will need to get started.

how to make mead

•2-3 pounds of honey, depending on how sweet you want to end product to be.
•Berries or fruit of any kind, fresh or frozen, about a cup
•One orange
•About 10 raisins
•Champagne yeast
•1 gallon jar or jug (you can reuse one that you bought for making hard cider) with it’s lid
•Airlock with rubber stopper that fits into your jar
•Big metal spoon
•Funnel
•A large pot (not pictured)
•Brewing sanitizer (I like One Step
I should mention right now that whenever you add fruit to a mead it’s technically called a melomel. You could also use apple cider instead of water and then you’d have what’s called a cyser. Also, this is a recipe for one gallon of mead, but I’m always of the mind that if you’re making one you might as well make two, especially if you already have two glass jugs from my hard cider recipe, as it’s really not any harder.

Alright, let’s get started! The first thing you need to do is sanitize everything! Your jug, airlock, big pot, spoon and funnel. Just follow the directions for your sanitizer and don’t throw it out until you’re totally done (just in case your dog licks the funnel or you drop your spoon).

Once that’s done put about 1/2 gallon of water (non chlorinated if possible) in your pot on medium heat. Once it’s warm, but not boiling, add the honey and stir it so it all dissolves.

how to make meadTurn the heat off. It may be a little foamy, that’s ok, just don’t boil it.

how to make meadIn the meantime, put your berries (or any fruit of your liking), orange slices (skin and all) and raisins into your jug.

how to make meadThen use your funnel and carefully pour the honey water mixture (technically called “must”) into your jar.

how to make meadTop off your jar with cold water, leaving at least 2 inches of head space on top.

homemade meadThen put the lid on your jar and gently mix everything around a bit. The next step is to add the yeast, but you need to make sure that it isn’t too hot so that you don’t kill the yeast. It should feel lukewarm, use a thermometer if you’re unsure, at least less than 90°F. Then you can add the yeast. One yeast package will make up to 5 gallons of mead, so if you’re doing 2 gallons you can just split one between the 2 jars.

how to make meadNow put the lid back on tightly and this time you’re really going to shake it up for several minutes. It’s a good workout for your arm muscles so you can skip the gym on days when you make mead!

homemade meadPut a little water in the airlock to the line, then put the rubber stopper into your jug. In a few hours, or at least by the next morning, you should see bubbles in your jar and in your airlock.

how to make meadThe whole top might get a little foamy at first, but things will settle down. I love watching all the little bubbles! Science rocks! (Can you see my hands in the reflection?)

Keep it in a cool (not cold) dark place. Mead takes longer to ferment than cider or beer, depending on the temperature it will take anywhere from 4-6 weeks. I usually give it 6 weeks to be on the safe side for bottling as you don’t want any explosions! I’ve definitely had some very champagne like mead before. You want to wait until you don’t see any bubbles and your airlock is still.

Bottling one or two gallons of mead is pretty much the same process as bottling cider. You may want to wait awhile to drink your mead as it definitely gets better with age, but I often drink it “green” (young) as I enjoy it either way. It is fun to save a couple of bottles for several months, or even a year, just to see how the taste changes with age.

If you make one gallon of mead, chances are you will soon want to make more! Lucky for you, I have also written a posts on How to Make 5 Gallons of Mead and How to Bottle 5 Gallons of Mead. I also have recipes for Wildflower Mead and Elderberry Mead that turned out delicious!

Cheers and happy mead making!

The All-Ireland Pollinator Plan encourages sanctuaries for threatened species

The All-Ireland Pollinator Plan encourages sanctuaries for threatened species, says Mary O’Riordan.

Pollinating bees help to keep home food prices relatively low and could be worth more than €7 m a year to the apple crop in the North

Allowing weeds to grow and flower in our lawns is one of the recommended ways to save bees from extinction and to help prevent starvation.

With one third of our 98 species of native bees facing wipe-out, an All-Ireland Pollinator Plan has been devised to encourage gardeners, farmers, schools and councils to create havens and resources for the island’s threatened species.

Evidence from the United States has shown that dandelions and white clover on lawns can support 37 different species of bees.

In the study, white clover was important for honeybees and bumblebees whereas solitary bees, honeybees and hoverflies predominated on dandelion.

However, if you cannot stomach having your whole lawn covered in dandelion, (which is an excellent accompaniment in salads), the Pollinator Plan encourages us to leave small areas of the lawn uncut to allow flowering weeds to blossom and provide food for bees.

We can also grow more flowers, shrubs and trees that provide nectar and pollen for pollinators.

The advice is to make sure that your garden has at least one flowering food source from spring right through to winter like willow (early spring and currently blossoming), dandelion shortly after, clovers (early summer), lavender (late summer), ivy (autumn) and mahonia (winter).

Most bees prefer plants which have flowers at the blue, purple and pink end of the colour spectrum.

Dr Una FitzPatrick, from the National Biodiversity Data Centre in Waterford IT, said the problem is serious and requires immediate attention to ensure the sustainability of our food production and to protect the health of our environment.

The rescue plan, which has over 25 recommendations, will be a success if bee populations enjoy a revival within the next five years.

“We spent 40 years creating the problem so we are not going to solve it overnight,” she said.

Pollination itself is the transfer of pollen grains, the male sex cells of a flower, from the anther where they are produced to the receptive surface of the female organ of a flower. either on the same flower or another one. Bees are good pollinators for many reasons.

Their hairy bodies trap pollen and they spit on their front legs and then brush the pollen into a sticky ball that they store on their back legs in pollen baskets which they carry between flowers and eventually back to the hive to help feed the young.

The bees require large quantities of nectar and pollen to rear their young, and they visit flowers regularly in large numbers to obtain these foods.

In doing so, they concentrate on one species of plant at a time and serve as good pollinators for this reason.

Their body size enables them to pollinate flowers of many different shapes and sizes.

Honey bees are most active at temperatures between 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C.

Winds reduce their activity and stop it completely at about 25 miles per hour.

When conditions for flight are not ideal, honey bees work close to their colonies or don’t work at all.

Although they may fly as far as 7km in search of food, they usually go no farther than 1.5 to 2km in good weather.

In unfavourable weather, bees may visit only those plants nearest the hive. They also tend to work closer to the hive in areas where there are large numbers of attractive plants in bloom. A honeybee will make about 12 pollen collecting flights a day in peak season.

One third of our bee species, including the honeybee, 20 bumblebees and 77 solitary bees are threatened with extinction and the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan is trying to reverse this trend.

Besides preserving threatened species, the economic value of bee pollination is also a huge incentive.

Pollinating bees help to keep homegrown food prices relatively low and could be worth more than €7 million a year to the apple crop in Northern Ireland, and €3.9m for oilseed rape in the Republic.

Méabh Boylan, An Taisce’s green-schools biodiversity officer, said: “The importance of pollinators to humans cannot be overstated as pollinators are responsible for making approximately one in every three spoonfuls of food that we eat.”

In the pollinator plan, national transport chiefs have also agreed to reduce roadside mowing on main roads and to open south-facing railway embankments for bee nests in further attempts to create bee highways along road networks and railway lines.

This bee highway scheme makes the Republic and Northern Ireland one of the first regions in Europe to adopt such a wide-ranging plan and it mimics similar ideas being tested in Norway and in parts of Britain.

Farmers are also encouraged to maintain flowering hedgerows that contain hazel, willow, blackthorn and hawthorn. Bramble is an excellent source of food in the summer so cutting of hedgerows should be every three years or cut only a third every year.

The base of hedgerows shouldn’t be sprayed. By cutting field margins and buffer strips only once or twice in a season and preferably before April and then in early September gives wildflowers a chance to set seed and retains late forage sources for the pollinators.

Dr Jane Stout, associate professor in botany at Trinity College Dublin, has said: “If we want pollinators to be available to pollinate our crops and wild plants for future generations, we need to manage the landscape in a more sustainable way and create a joined-up network of diverse and flower-rich habitats as well as reduce our use of chemical insecticides.

“And this doesn’t just mean in the countryside, but in our towns and villages as well.”

The All-Ireland Pollinator Plan can be downloaded from the Biodiversity Ireland website and a very interesting children’s version is also downloadable.

For those interested in beekeeping or the plight of Irish bees, log onto the website of the Irish Honey Bee Society to find out about meetings and membership.