Kill Sinus Infection in 20 Seconds With This Simple Method And This Common Household Ingredient!

There is nothing quite as easy as this technique.

It call comes down to pushing your tongue against the roof of your mouth and placing the thumb in between your eyebrows.

You need to pressure the area you are holding with your thumb for 20 seconds. The first results come almost immediately, followed by sinus drainage.

Step-by-step method

The nasal cavity holds a bone, also known as the Vomer bone, which is placed vertically in the cavity. Lisa De Stefano, D.O., an assistant professor at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, assures us that this method is very successful because it allows the Vomer bone to move back and forth.

This ultimately treats congestion and empties the sinuses by draining.

The ingredient that can also help you to kill sinus infection is apple cider vinegar and 100% Raw local Honey 

The marvels that apple cider vinegar brings just can’t stop rising.

Its benefits are widely appreciated by the world’s population, and in this article we present how this magical liquid can cure your sinus infection in no time!

Viruses are usually responsible for causing sinus infection, and those viruses tend to stick inside the organism even after the lungs are cleared.

Basically, the sinuses lining becomes inflamed, and this occurrence leads to chronic headaches, discomfort and pain. In some cases, a fever could happen as well.

There are numerous medications available, promising to cure sinus infection rapidly, but nothing works quite as effective as the good old apple cider vinegar.

As common as it may be, apple cider vinegar is not to be underappreciated. It can easily reduce sinus pain and brings the sinus tissue to a healthy state.

Rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber, the ACV will cease any sickness symptoms and if consumed raw and unfiltered, will provide the greatest health benefits for your body.

Aside from this, your immune system will hugely benefit from consuming apple cider vinegar- and here is how to do it:


  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1/4 cup unfiltered apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon raw honey
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 lemon, juiced


First boil water and then combine it with apple cider vinegar in a glass. Throw in honey, cayenne pepper and stir well. Finally, add lemon juice. Consume remedy until you feel sinus pain relief.

Well done!


Pollinators in Ireland

Pollinators in Ireland
cropsbeescroptipbeesBees are the most important pollinating insect because they visit flowers to collect food for their larvae, as well as feeding on floral resources as adults. In Ireland crops such as apples, clover, strawberries and oilseed rape all benefit from pollination and a recent study from the Department of the Environment valued this ‘ecosystem service’ that bees provide at €85m a year to the economy.

2013: Worldwide study shows the decline of wild bees and other pollinators may be an even more alarming threat to crop yields than the loss of honeybees, revealing the irreplaceable contribution of wild insects to global food production.

In Ireland there are 101 species of bee, including the familiar honeybee (One species) and 20 bumblebee species. The remaining species are solitary, meaning they do not form colonies.

Amongst the most well-known services performed by a healthy biodiversity is pollination. Bees are the keystone pollinator species making more flower visits than any other insect. There is a need however for urgent action as our wild bees are facing an unprecedented crisis in declining populations due to agricultural intensification, habitat degradation, disease and parasite spread, and climate change. Pollinators play a crucial role in our farms, gardens and countryside – we cannot afford to take them for granted.

Gardening for Bees

Gardens are extremely important for bees, and vice versa. Bees need flowers for sustenance, and flowers need bees for pollination. But it’s important the flowers you grow provide the food bees need. So Let’s Bee Friendly by turning part of your garden into a bumblebee haven!


  • As a rule of thumb your garden should provide bee-friendly flowers, open cup shaped flowers are the bees’ favorites such as foxgloves, that are rich in pollen and nectar which bees can easily access from spring until late summer. This will ensure that there is a good supply of pollen at all of the crucial times.
  • Flowers clustered into clumps of one species will attract more pollinators than individual plants scattered through the habitat patch.
  • Plants like Pussy Willow and Bluebell are excellent early-year food sources. Mahonia and Hebe are good non-native options
  • In early summer Honeysuckle and Thyme are ideal, and in late summer Heathers, Knapweed, Scabious, and non-native species like Sunflowers, Sweet pea and Lavender will provide plenty for bees to forage on.
  • If you can, leave an area of your lawn uncut during summer to allow Clovers and Bird’s-foot Trefoil to flower. Leaving uncut verges or planting wildflower meadows will greatly benefit bees.
  • Many solitary species nest in south facing banks, so leaving exposed areas of soil at the edges of lawns or creating south facing banks of sandy or clay soil will attract ground nesting species. Other species will nest in dead wood or in south facing stonewalls

Feeling Sick? Turmeric Milk, Not Turmeric Tea, is the Cold Remedy You Need

Feeling Sick? Turmeric Milk, Not Turmeric Tea, is the Cold

Remedy You Need

turmeric milk golden milk-001

For years, I’ve been adding turmeric to my homemade cold remedy, a fragrant mixture of hot water, lemon, ginger, honey, and cayenne. Here in Los Angeles, you can see it everywhere as a superspice ingredient in juices and smoothies. But it wasn’t recently that I realized that most of us are doing it all wrong, and that we need to be stirring turmeric into some warm milk instead.

Meet the Superspice Turmeric

A bright yellow spice that colors mustard and curries, turmeric is a part of Ayurvedic medicine and has now been studied extensively in the West for its anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and antibacterial properties. Prevention magazine reports that it might be a preventative against Alzheimer’s and other studies suggest that it can reduce cholesterol, improve digestion, and stimulate the immune system. In short, it’s an amazing spice.

I’m a health and food editor, so I have skimmed and read every fact sheet and press release about the amazing health benefits of turmeric. But despite hundreds of headlines and articles about turmeric and its active agent curcumin, I hadn’t been reading the fine print. I hadn’t seen enough real-world ways to add turmeric to my diet besides the admittedly tasty route of curries, dal, and mustard.

Hows and Whys: Turmeric Milk, Not Turmeric Tea

It was a Tibetan friend who actually brought turmeric milk, or ‘golden milk’, to my attention. As a Tibetan-in-exile, she was raised in India, and she shook her head when she saw me drinking my cold-fighting concoction one day. She commented that I should be putting turmeric in my milk, not my tea. When I asked why, she didn’t elaborate beyond saying that they had been doing it that way in South Asia for centuries.

Just a little research into the issue yielded big results. Just like with many other supplements, popping a curcumin pill or stirring some turmeric into your tea is not enough. The problem with turmeric, it turns out, is that it has very low bio-availability when its eaten by itself. In normalspeak, that means your body has a hard time absorbing it and all its wonderful health benefits.

But there are two things in your kitchen that will help your body to absorb turmeric. One is fat and the other is black pepper. That is the reason that turmeric is best stirred into warm milk and not dissolved into watery tea. It’s also the reason that experts think people in India have the lowest rates of Alzheimer’s in the world – curries are made with both fat (cooking oil) and black pepper.

turmeric milk recipe how to-001

How to Make Turmeric Milk, or Golden Milk, a Delicious Cold Remedy

1 cup milk (cow, almond, coconut, rice, hemp, soy are all fine as long as they have some fat)
1 tsp Turmeric
1 Tbsp raw wild honey
½ tsp Cinnamon
black pepper, a pinch

1. Heat up your milk in the microwave or on the stove.
2. Add turmeric and whisk to combine.
3. Stir in honey and cinnamon and mix well.
4. Add a pinch of black pepper and stir.

Sit back and enjoy your virus-fighting, anti-inflammatory, relaxing, and fragrant beverage.